Intestinal Adaptation and Treatment Options

Intestinal adaptation

After an extensive resection, the intestines have an innate ability to adapt, regaining absorptive capacity across the remaining intestine. This is known as intestinal adaptation and happens when there are gradual improvements in the structural and functional nature of the intestine that enhance absorption.1,2 These gradual changes can eventually help reduce, or completely remove the need for parenteral support for SBS patients with intestinal failure (SBS-IF).1,2

However, many patients require long-term parenteral support, which is associated with some serious complications (see Parenteral Support).1,3,4 In an effort to improve patient outcomes, investigation is ongoing into alternative treatments for SBS.1,5

These gradual changes can eventually help reduce, or
completely remove the need for parenteral support
for patients with SBS-IF1–3

Treatment options

Treatment options

People who require ongoing parenteral support for their SBS-IF often need medication to manage symptoms of their disorder (Table 1).1,6 These medications aim to help reduce the symptoms of the disorder, but do not improve absorption in the intestine.1,5 

Several targets for therapies of SBS-IF are being investigated for the purpose of improving intestinal absorption and/or reducing dependency on parenteral support.1,5 

For further information please consult your doctor. 


References

  1. Hofstetter S, Stern L, Willet J. Key issues in addressing the clinical and humanistic burden of short bowel syndrome in the US. Curr Med Res Opin 2013;29(5):495–504.
  2. Tappenden KA. Intestinal adaptation following resection. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr 2014;38(1 Suppl):23S–31S.
  3. Jeppesen PB. Spectrum of short bowel syndrome in adults: intestinal insufficiency to intestinal failure. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr 2014;38(1 Suppl):8S–13S.
  4. Mullady DK, O'Keefe SJ. Treatment of intestinal failure: home parenteral nutrition. Nat Clin Pract Gastroenterol Hepatol 2006;3(9):492–504.
  5. Kelly DG, Tappenden KA, Winkler MF. Short bowel syndrome: highlights of patient management, quality of life, and survival. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr 2014;38(4):427–37.
  6. Matarese LE. Nutrition and fluid optimization for patients with short bowel syndrome. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr 2013;37(2):161–70.

     

     

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